Archive - Sunday, July 23, 2017

Wed
31
Dec

U.S.-ASIA PACIFIC VOICES ON COMBATING TERRORISM IN 2003

Numerous speakers and program participants at the East-West Center have offered different perspectives on terrorism and global violence, how it has impacted their own countries, and how the world might best move forward in 2003. Below is a summary of some of those perspectives.

Included in this report:

1. Bambang Harymurti, editor-in-chief of Tempo, a leading Indonesian weekly newsmagazine: Is Indonesia The Next Afghanistan?

2. Haynes Johnson, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, best-selling author, TV commentator, and Knight Chair in Journalism at the University of Maryland: America And The Crisis Of Change

3. Walter Nalangu, manager of news and current affairs at the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Company and a Fall 2002 Jefferson Fellow: Violence Targets Media

4. Participants of "Changing Faces: Envisioning Women's Leadership in Asia, the Pacific and the United States": Women Must Lead In Fighting Terrorism

5. Bina Sharif, Pakistani-American...

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Wed
31
Dec

SLOW-ACTING FIJI GOVERNMENT THREATENS FISHING INDUSTRY

Editorial

FijiSUN

SUVA, Fiji (Dec. 31) - The almighty row between the Department of Fisheries and the nation’s fishing industry operators represents a perfect example of why the civil service has to change its culture, its values and its operations.

All licenses expire tomorrow and the department has decided to examine each and every license issued to ensure that it is genuine before issuing a renewal.

About time too, say industry sources.

But the highly detailed information required by the department takes time to compile. It is not something that can be produced overnight. 

Now the department left it until the middle of this month to commence asking for this information when officials must surely have known that it could not be delivered before December 31.

In fact, at least one firm says it was still receiving requests for information on Monday.

It must be stressed that this is seen as a positive step by many in the fishing...

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Wed
31
Dec

‘WESTERNIZATION’ NO PANACEA FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Commentary

‘WESTERNIZATION’ NO PANACEA FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

By A. Gaffar Peang-Meth

HAGATNA, Guam (Pacific Daily News, Dec. 31) - One of Asia's best-known, world-class statesman is 80-year-old Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore. Lee converted Singapore, a small island with a population of slightly more than four million, from Third-World to First-World status in one generation.

Fareed Zakaria, editor of Newsweek International, wrote that Richard Nixon felt Lee would have achieved the status of a Churchill, Disraeli or Gladstone, had Lee lived in another country at another time.

Lee is an Asian intellectual giant, whose blunt words on numerous subjects have made him politically incorrect. And his unambiguous advice on attaining economic growth, while maintaining political order and control, has carried great influence.

The Council on Foreign Relations' "Foreign Affairs Agenda 1995: Critical Issues in Foreign Policy" contains a...

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Wed
31
Dec

AUSSIE CATTLE SHARES JUMP AS U.S. RANCHERS REEL

MELBOURNE, Australia (Radio Australia, Dec. 31) - Share prices in Australia's second biggest cattle company have jumped following the detection of mad cow disease in the United States.

The Australian Agricultural Company is the only local cattle company listed on the Australian Stock Exchange and has seen a 17 percent increase in share prices since last week's announcement of the discovery of the disease in Washington state.

The business includes 400,000 cattle and 21 cattle stations in Northern Australia.

Chief executive Peter Holmes a'Court is cautious about the share jump, saying the success of the business depends on management.

But he says there are opportunities for the business to make further gains in major markets, like Japan.

"South American will be in there trying very hard to get market share from Americans, as we will be trying to fill any void created," he said.

...

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Wed
31
Dec

FIJI’S AIR PACIFIC TO ADD FLIGHT MARSHALS

FIJI’S AIR PACIFIC TO ADD FLIGHT MARSHALS

By Otilly Rabuku

SUVA, Fiji (FijiSUN, Dec. 31) - Fiji’s national airline, Air Pacific, is offering security training for its flight staff, in response to a growing global terrorism threat.

Air Pacific acting chief executive officer, Josephine Yee Joy, remained tight-lipped on the issue but confirmed its flight crews had undergone aviation security training.

The FijiSUN also understands that the airline plans to hire three sky marshals from Australia who will provide security training to the cabin crew and pilots.

Part of the training includes martial arts, while it is not known if instructions will be given on responses to firearm threats. 

Fiji Military Forces spokesman, Warrant Officer Neumi Leweni, said he was not aware of any request to assist in the training.

"If the sky marshals come in, then they would be using dummies instead...

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Wed
31
Dec

PACIFIC DRUG RING LEADER GETS 22-YEAR SENTENCE

HONOLULU (The Maui News, Dec. 30) - Described as the leader of a Maui-based drug ring with ties to the Mainland and Pacific, a Wailuku man has been sentenced to nearly 22 years in federal prison.

Polotani "Paul" Latu, 31, was also ordered to pay a $25,000 fine as part of the sentence imposed Dec. 15 by U.S. District Judge Helen Gillmor.

Latu's prison term of 21 years and 10 months was the longest handed down so far to defendants indicted in connection with the drug ring, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Muehleck.

"I hope it sends the message that if you are involved in drug dealing and federal investigators are involved, you're going to be dealt with severely," Muehleck said. "If you violate the law, you're liable for federal investigation and prosecution and those sentences are more severe than under the state system."

Latu was among more than 55 people indicted in Hawaii and on the...

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Wed
31
Dec

FIJI LANDOWNER TO PROVIDE LOW-INCOME LOTS

By Sanjay Goundar

SUVA, Fiji (FijiSUN, Dec. 31) - One of the major leaseholders in Fiji plans to set aside more than 900 new lots to assist low-income earners and displaced farmers.

The Housing Authority of Fiji acting chief executive and general manager lending, Michael Lee, told the FijiSUN yesterday that the authority was concentrating more on assisting people who were either low- or middle-income earners and displaced farmers in need of residential land.

From early next year, 460 new lots will be available in Field 40, Lautoka, while a further 460 will be available from mid-next year in Waila, Nausori.

"These 920 lots are being developed and the ones in Lautoka are in the final stages of development and will be ready for streaming from early next year," he said.

Mr Lee said that in order to make land available at affordable prices the authority was liaising with the Government...

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Wed
31
Dec

TAHITI MADE ENVIRONMENT PRIORITY IN 2003

PAPEETE, Tahiti (Tahitipresse, Dec. 30 ) -   French Polynesia’s government made the environment a priority during 2003, equipping itself with an environmental code, while being honored by the World Wildlife Fund for its action on behalf of protecting whales and other sea mammals.

French Polynesia Government President Gaston Flosse announced in September 2002 that 2003 would be a Green Year with priority given to the protection of the environment and a two billion French Pacific franc (about US$21.5 million) overall budget for Environmental Minister Bruno Sandras.

Efforts were carried out in communications and public awareness with the launching of a new television campaign and the creation of prizes to reward businesses, associations and communes for their efforts to improve the environment. The mayors of French Polynesia also got into the act, making the environment the theme of their convention...

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Wed
31
Dec

FIJI AIRPORT OPERATES AT $1.5 MILLION LOSS

SUVA, Fiji (FijiSUN, Dec. 31) - Airports Fiji Ltd. is averaging a $1.5million loss per year through operations of the Nausori Airport, AFL chairman Viliame Leqa said yesterday.

"If there is anything for next year, it is to at least bring Nausori around to break even. That would be the biggest achievement for any board chairman or CEO," Mr Leqa said.

He said AFL was looking at three options: To make investments; rebuild and improve commercial activity around Nausori; or to contract out the management of the airport.

"We are looking into the third option, but of course we have to recommend that to Cabinet. If Cabinet approves, it’s probably the way to go."

He said there were people overseas who were "keen" to take up the challenge, adding that taxpayers would not lose out in this process and AFL would still control all the assets.

AFL would require $10 million to upgrade the airport and...

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Wed
31
Dec

PALAU BANS MARIANAS BETEL NUTS

KOROR, Palau (Palau Horizon, Dec. 31) — The Palau Bureau of Agriculture has warned against bringing betel nuts from Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands into Palau.

Agriculture Director Herman Francisco said a fungal disease has been reported to have infected betel nuts from the Mariana Islands.

He said these betel nuts could cause tremendous damage on local plants.

According to reports, the fungus that has infected the betel nuts on Guam may be the same disease that wiped out betel nut trees in the CNMI eight years ago.

Francisco said a betel nut tree would die once infected with the fungus, which usually infects the husk of the nut.

He said quarantine regulations require that any betel nut from Guam or from other islands will be confiscated at any Palau port of entry.

These betel nuts will be incinerated by the bureau.

December 31, 2003

Marianas...

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