Archive - April 2002

Mon
29
Apr
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FORMER MILITANTS CONTROL SOLOMON ISLANDS, VIOLENCE CONTINUES

HONOLULU, Hawai‘i (April 26, 2002 – East-West Wire/Pacific Islands Report)---"On a stretcher, wrapped in a blood-soaked cloth, was the body of a wantok, friend, and fellow Isatabu Freedom Movement leader...I embraced the bundle and wept. This was the body of Selwyn Saki, another casualty of Solomon Islands social unrest."

In a new East-West Center publication, Tarcisius Tara Kabutaulaka of the Solomon Islands writes that the brutal murderers of his friend were never apprehended because "those in positions of power have refused to let justice prevail." Such injustices are leading people in his country to no longer "have faith in the state."

Many Americans may best know the Solomons as the place where the late President John. F. Kennedy became a World War II Navy hero by rescuing his crewmembers off the PT-109. Solomon Islanders later delivered Kennedy and his men to safety. But in recent years the South Pacific nation has made headlines after a coup tore the islands...

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Mon
29
Apr
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PACIFIC’S ENVIRONMENT AGENCY APPOINTS LUI DEPUTY DIRECTOR

SOUTH PACIFIC REGIONAL ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME (SPREP) Apia, Samoa

PRESS RELEASE April 26, 2002

PACIFIC’S ENVIRONMENT AGENCY APPOINTS LUI DEPUTY DIRECTOR

After over four years without a Deputy Director, the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme is pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. F. Vitolio Lui as its Deputy Director. Mr. Lui has until recently been Samoa's Deputy Secretary for Foreign Affairs.

With over 28 years of continuous involvement primarily as Samoa's representative to most of the governing bodies of the Pacific's eight intergovernmental organizations, Mr. Lui has extensive experience in high level dialogues that will enhance the effectiveness of the position and the organization with its membership.

The Director of SPREP, Mr. Tamari’i Tutangata commented, "Mr. Lui is well known in the region and is highly respected for his work ethics and commitment of the highest order toward his responsibilities. These special...

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Apr
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UNIVERSITY TEACHER JOST SAYS FORGOTTEN CLIPPERTON ISLAND COULD BE USEFUL

PAPE‘ETE, Tahiti, French Polynesia (April 28, 2002 – Tahitipresse)---During a conference at the University of French Polynesia in Tahiti earlier this month, Christian Jost, geography teacher at the University of New Caledonia, stressed the importance of Clipperton, a small French uninhabited atoll located 3,100 miles to the northeast of Tahiti and 750 miles west of Mexico.

A French vessel discovered the 5.6 square miles island in 1711.

At the end of the 19th century, several companies exploited the island's guano.

The United States claimed the land in 1892, but France reclaimed Clipperton again a few months later.

Mexico installed a military garrison from 1897 to 1917.

Without any help from the government because of World War I and the Mexican revolution, most of the troops stationed on Clipperton starved to death.

The only man who remained alive became insane and claimed to be the "king of the island." He raped the women remaining on...

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Mon
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Apr
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ANZACS KEEP THE PACIFIC’S PEACE IN BOUGAINVILLE

By Michael Field

AUCKLAND, New Zealand (April 25, 2002 – Agence France-Presse)---When it comes to peacekeeping, Australia and New Zealand are nearly at war with each other and the neighbors do not think much of them either, a new book claims.

Both nations Thursday celebrated the myth of "ANZAC," the heroic linking of both military forces to fight common enemies, but the book reviewing peacekeeping operations in Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) Bougainville presents a rather grimmer view.

In the eyes of Australians, their New Zealand counterparts were good for guitars and war dances but hopeless at soldiering. New Zealand fighters see Australians as culturally insensitive clods, while Fijian and Vanuatu solders see both Australian and New Zealand soldiers as uncouth hedonists.

Bougainville was the scene of a bitter civil war between 1988 and 1997 in which, primarily, the Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA) fought the PNG Defense Force. It ended with a truce...

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CROCODILE KILLS GUADALCANAL MAN

HONIARA, Solomon Islands (April 26, 2002 - Solomon Star/PINA Nius Online)---A Guadalcanal man was killed by a crocodile while fishing with two companions in the Hoilava River.

The man's fishing companions were unable to do anything when their friend disappeared into the river waters, gripped by the crocodile.

Parts of the man's body were recovered the next day by searchers and taken to his village for burial. He left behind his wife and five children.

People are being warned to take care in river areas because of the increasing number of crocodiles.

Pacific Islands News Association (PINA) Website: http://www.pinanius.org 

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Sat
27
Apr

FORMER MILITANTS CONTROL SOLOMON ISLANDS, VIOLENCE CONTINUES

HONOLULU, Hawai‘i (April 26, 2002 – East-West Wire)---"On a stretcher, wrapped in a blood-soaked cloth, was the body of a wantok, friend, and fellow Isatabu Freedom Movement leader...I embraced the bundle and wept. This was the body of Selwyn Saki, another casualty of Solomon Islands social unrest."

In a new East-West Center publication, Tarcisius Tara Kabutaulaka of the Solomon Islands writes that the brutal murderers of his friend were never apprehended because "those in positions of power have refused to let justice prevail." Such injustices are leading people in his country to no longer "have faith in the state."

Many Americans may best know the Solomons as the place where the late President John. F. Kennedy became a World War II Navy hero by rescuing his crewmembers off the PT-109. Solomon Islanders later delivered Kennedy and his men to safety. But in recent years the South Pacific nation has made headlines after a coup tore the islands apart in 2000.

...

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Sat
27
Apr

CHINESE VICE PRESIDENT'S U.S. VISIT LIKELY TO EMPHASIZE ATMOSPHERE, NOT

SUBSTANCE

HONOLULU, Hawai‘i (April 26, 2002 – East-West Wire)---China's Vice President Hu Jintao will set foot on American soil Saturday, but his visit will offer little of substance and fall short of some U.S. expectations, according to an East-West Center specialist on China.

Hu, coming as Vice President Dick Cheney's official guest, is widely anticipated to lead China through the next decade, and both the United States and the world expect to gain a closer understanding of this still relatively unknown man

"This visit will likely be rich in atmospherics, but provide little substantive movement in Sino-U.S. relations," said Christopher McNally, an East-West Center fellow.

McNally said the Bush administration sees two key opportunities, explaining why Hu will also hold meetings with President George Bush, the State Department and perhaps the Pentagon. Bush would like to establish a close rapport with Hu, who is only three years older than him, and...

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Fri
26
Apr
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JOINT U.S.-JAPAN MILITARY EXERCISE COLORS GUAM SKYLINE

By Theresa Merto

HAGÅTÑA, Guam (April 26, 2002 – Pacific Daily News)---A joint military exercise is scheduled to wrap up today and officials already have expressed interest in returning to the island next year.

Cope North Guam-O2 is a training exercise involving the U.S. Air Force and Marines, and Japan Air Self-Defense Force troops and aircraft.

The exercise, which began April 15, is designed to enhance both countries' air operations.

"The exercise has gone quite well," said U.S. Air Force Capt. Richelle Dowdell, Cope North Guam public affairs officer. "Everyone is pleased with the results."

One by one, a variety of jets shot off the Andersen Air Force Base runway yesterday, filling the blue skies with thunderous roars.

Aircraft participating in the exercise include the F-16 Wild Weasels, F-15 Strike Eagles and F/A 18 Hornets, Air Force officials said.

This is the fourth time Andersen has hosted the annual event and this year,...

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Fri
26
Apr
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FIRST 100 DAYS: A HUMBLING EXPERIENCE FOR CNMI GOVERNOR BABAUTA

By Jayvee Vallejera

SAIPAN, Northern Mariana Islands (April 25, 2002 – Saipan Tribune)---The Babauta administration marked its first 100 days in office last Tuesday, with Gov. Juan N. Babauta saying that, beyond the specific problems and issues facing his administration, what he considers the biggest challenge for his government is changing the attitude of the community.

"To work together, to pull our resources together and to lessen the acrimonious relationship that have gone through between the administration and the legislature in the past, which are things that slow us down," Babauta said.

With the rest of his term before him, Babauta told reporters this is a much bigger challenge that he and Lt. Governor Diego Benavente would be working on.

"To make this place a better place for our tourist industry, as well as making the system and the government respond to the needs of the people so that there’s confidence on the part of the business community...

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MANAGEMENT OF FIJI’S LUCRATIVE CORAL TRADE UP FOR DISCUSSION AT CANADIAN FUNDED WORKSHOP

SOUTH PACIFIC REGIONAL ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME (SPREP) Apia, Samoa

PRESS RELEASE April 25, 2002 Nadi, Fiji Islands

MANAGEMENT OF FIJI’S LUCRATIVE CORAL TRADE UP FOR DISCUSSION AT CANADIAN FUNDED WORKSHOP

How best to preserve and enhance management of Fiji’s coral trade was the subject of an intensive workshop held this week in Nadi. The workshop was funded by the Canada South Pacific Ocean Development (C-SPOD) Programme and coordinated by the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

In opening the workshop Fiji’s Director of Fisheries, Mr. Maciu Lagibalavu, stressed the importance of Fiji meeting its obligations under the Convention on the Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which Fiji signed in 1997. He noted that this was a significant step forward in helping Fiji to continue to trade in various species. Lagibalevu also noted it was because of the long-term benefits for Fiji and for Fiji’s reefs that the...

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