Archive - April 2002

Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

I WILL RETURN AS PAPUA NEW GUINEA PM: SIR MEKERE

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea (April 25, 2002 – The National)---Prime Minister Sir Mekere Morauta yesterday confidently predicted that he would remain in power after the June elections.

Speaking at the inaugural "2002 Money Show" at the Holiday Inn Hotel in Port Moresby, Sir Mekere told a questioner, history showed that 50 percent of sitting Members of Parliament would successfully retain their seats.

He said if that were the case, his party, the People's Democratic Movement, would return with 20 seats, with a likelihood that its ranks would be further strengthened after the election.

"If I am leading the largest party, the Governor General will ask me to have a go at forming the government," Sir Mekere said.

Sir Mekere said he needed two to three more years to pursue reforms that had brought inflation down from a high of 22 percent under the previous government to 9.3 percent last year.

Foreign exchange reserves, which had been exhausted when he...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

WEATHER DELAYS FAGALII (SAMOA) AIRPORT UPGRADES

By Fili Sagapolutele

PAGO PAGO, American Samoa (April 24, 2002 – Samoa News)---Fagalii Airport will be closed for another week dues to delays caused by bad weather, according to a spokesman for the Samoa Airport Authorities yesterday.

A bulletin from the Samoa government was issued to all Fagalii Airport users that the airport will not re-open until April 29th.

The upgrade work at Fagalii Airport, located five minutes outside downtown Apia, includes tar resealing of the runway and renovation of the parking area and main terminal.

The renovation work is part of the Samoa government's efforts to upgrade Fagalii Airport to international standards. It has been hampered by bad weather since a week ago Wednesday.

Sources told the Samoa News that there is a possibility that Fagalii will remain closed for two weeks instead of one because of the long delays due to the bad weather.

"It should be confirmed by this Friday if work will be completed in...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

FIJI CABINET BALL IN QARASE'S COURT

EDITORIAL Fiji Times Suva, Fiji Islands

April 25, 2002

The widely anticipated judgment that Laisenia Qarase breached the Constitution when he formed his Cabinet will come as no surprise.

In the High Court at Lautoka yesterday Justice Anthony Gates ruled that Mr. Qarase must consult the leader of the Fiji Labour Party, Mahendra Chaudhry, and that he must admit to his Cabinet sufficient FLP members to reflect their numbers in the Lower House.

That, however, is unlikely to be the end of the matter, which had already been considered by the Appeals Court. Mr. Qarase and Mr. Chaudhry are not friends. It seems they find it difficult even to be polite colleagues. The likelihood of their cooperation in a multiparty and multiracial Cabinet is as remote as it is desirable.

Mr. Qarase has all long displayed a steely determination to push through his policies that lean heavily towards improvement for indigenous Fijians.

Mr. Chaudhry and his FLP...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

AMERICA COMPLICIT IN MICRONESIAN ISLANDERS’ SUFFERING

Island Voices: Honolulu Advertiser

By Melissa Arakawa, Melissa Kramer, Connie Liu, David Mayeda, Jaime Mitsuda, Galahad Quartero, Dawn Sueoka, Thomas Tsutsumoto, Kristina Woo and Dustin Yim: University of Hawai'i at Manoa students

HONOLULU, Hawai‘i (April 22, 2002 – Honolulu Advertiser)---Hawai'i has recently seen a substantial increase in immigration from sectors of Micronesia (Alice Keesing, "Pacific Migrants Run Up Hefty Healthcare Tab," March 2, 2002).

While it is true that higher proportions of these immigrants are migrating to Hawai'i with health problems, Keesing's article portrays Micronesian migrants as opportunists, stripping local residents of economic resources.

This article does not explain to readers why some of these Pacific migrants have contracted serious ailments.

For instance, in the Marshall Islands, health problems were heavily induced by U.S. military expansion. Marshallese were forced off their lands and exposed to nuclear...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

NEW ZEALAND PLANS POLICE HELP FOR SOLOMON ISLANDS

HONIARA, Solomon Islands (April 25, 2002 – SIBC/Solomon Star/PINA Nius Online)---A five-member New Zealand Development Assistance team is in the Solomon Islands looking at ways New Zealand police can help the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force.

Acting New Zealand High Commissioner Paul Willis said members will study how New Zealand police can help the Solomon Islands government and police bring security so desired by the people.

He said options include:

The visit comes amid law and order problems in the Solomon Islands despite the peace agreement ending two years of ethnic conflict. Hundreds of high-powered guns still have not been recovered.

The Royal Solomon Islands Police Force was badly damaged by the takeover of its main armory in the 2000 Honiara coup, and participation of some Police Field Force members in the coup.

These continuing problems are in turn hurting efforts to rebuild the economy, including restarting key industries and...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

BILL PAVES WAY FOR CREMATIONS IN COOK ISLANDS

By Moana Moeka'a

AVARUA, Rarotonga, Cook Islands (April 19, 2002 -- Cook Islands News)---The traditional burying of bodies could slowly give way to cremations when the new Public Health bill becomes law.

The draft bill paves the way for the Queen's Representative, by Order in Executive Council, to make regulations to have cremations take place in the Cook Islands.

"In terms of the sensitivity on cremations, it's a real paradigm shift of thinking," says Health secretary Tupu Araiti.

"Instead of burying the body, you're burning the body.

"So there's that sensitive issue that customs and practices and traditional ways that we have, have to be considered at this new way of handling a loved one when they die."

Cook Islands Christian Church president Rev. Tangimetua Tangatatutai personally believes it is really up to the individual to decide as to how he or she wants to be interred.

However, he can see the practicalities of those who...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

JAPAN TO CONTINUE PUSH FOR COMMERCIAL WHALING

SHIMONOSEKI, Japan – (April 25, 2002 – The New Zealand Herald/Reuters)---It was business as usual at the Karato fish market on Thursday as early morning customers picked over the boiled whale and whale bacon on offer, just a short taxi ride away from the opening session of the annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission.

Japan, long criticized for its "scientific" whaling program, will push again with fellow whaler Norway for a lifting of a ban on commercial whaling at the meetings, being held in one of Japan's oldest whaling ports.

A lifting of the ban is unlikely this time, but Japanese officials hope to win more support for sustainable use of whale species such as minkes, which they say are numerous.

"Before the actual resumption of commercial whaling, we have to overcome many hurdles," Joji Morishita, deputy director of the Fisheries Agency's Far Seas Fisheries Division, told Reuters.

One of the biggest hurdles is that a three-quarters...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

KEEP UP WITH KNOWLEDGE -- OR MISS OUT, WARNS USP VICE CHANCELLOR CHANDRA

By Shoma Prasad and Shivanjani Naidu

SUVA, Fiji Islands (April 25, 2002 - Wansolwara Online-USP Journalism/Pasifik Nius)---Pacific Islanders must keep abreast of the rapidly growing "knowledge industry" or risk being relegated to the lower rungs of the new world economy, warns Professor Rajesh Chandra, Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the University of the South Pacific.

In his opening address for the joint 2002 Institute of Education (IOE) advisory seminar and donors' meeting at the Laucala campus in Suva yesterday, Prof. Chandra said that in order to be globally competitive, the emphasis should be on higher education, with value added activities.

The growth of knowledge societies has major implications for island societies, he said

"The best way to compete with the rest of the world is to collaborate and form a partnership in order to make best use of scarce resources and represent the most progressive ways of operating in a highly networked world," he said...

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

RESEARCHERS WARN OF DWINDLING LEATHERBACK SEA TURTLE NUMBERS

MONTEREY, California (April 25, 2002 – Radio Australia)---Scientists say giant Pacific leatherback sea turtles are facing extinction due to commercial fishing and man-made destruction of their beach nesting areas.

Speaking at the Leatherback International Survival conference in Monterey, California researchers said only a handful of females returned to nesting beaches along the Pacific coast last season -- down from thousands 20 years ago.

The weeklong meeting is aimed at bringing together marine biologists, environmental activists and fishing industry representatives to seek ways to ensure the survival of the only sea turtles without shells.

Pacific leatherbacks -- which are genetically distinct from those in the Atlantic Ocean -- are particularly in peril because their numbers have sunk to only about 3,000.

For additional reports from Radio Australia, go to PACIFIC ISLANDS REPORT News/Information Links: Radio/TV News/Radio Australia.

+ continue reading
Fri
26
Apr
admin's picture

FIJI PM QARASE’S CABINET CHALLENGE

FIJI PM QARASE’S CABINET CHALLENGE

SUVA, Fiji Islands (April 25, 2002 – The Daily Post/FijiLive)---Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase should rise to the challenge of the hour and include the Fiji Labour Party in his Cabinet, the Citizens Constitutional Forum says.

Forum executive director Reverend Akuila Yabaki made the comments after the High Court ruling yesterday.

The Lautoka High Court yesterday again ruled Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase's government as unconstitutional and ordered him to include the Fiji Labour Party in his Cabinet.

High Court Judge Justice Anthony Gates ordered the Prime Minister to consult Labour leader Mahendra Chaudhry in accordance with section 99 (9) of the 1997 Constitution and advise President Ratu Josefa Iloilo to appoint Labour parliamentary members as ministers to the Cabinet in accordance to its proportion to their members in the House of Representatives.

Justice Gates ordered the Qarase-led government to pay legal...

+ continue reading

Pages