FRENCH POLYNESIA NEWS

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November 2, 1999
PINA Nius Online

TAHITI STUDENTS TO CREATE WORLD'S BIGGEST GARLAND

PAPEETE, French Polynesia (November 2, 1999 - PINA Nius Online)---French Polynesia's primary schools have decided to join hands to form what is hoped to be the world's biggest flower garland and enter the Guiness World Book of Records, RFO-radio reports.

The schools’ plan is to take advantage of National Children's Rights Day, on November 20, to organize a garland-making competition throughout the archipelago.

Celebrations that day also will include essay and drawing competitions.

The winning class will receive a computer.

Charitable associations and the Youth Economic Chamber thought it would be fitting to gather all the garlands, which will be made individually, and form them into one single huge garland.

The gathering process is to take place under the supervision of an attorney who would then certify the result and make it eligible for the Guiness World Book of Records.

The world's biggest garland would be "an offering by French Polynesia's children to the children of the world," organizers said, and it would aim at "symbolizing the link from one generation to the other." It would be named "the link of the heart."

 

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS STUDENTS IN FRENCH POLYNESIA

PAPEETE, French Polynesia (November 2, 1999 - PINA Nius Online)---Students from the prestigious Kamehameha Schools in Hawai‘i ended a visit to Tahiti Monday, part of a regional tour, RFO-radio reports.

The 30-member group, accompanied by ten adults, was on its way back from Easter island (Rapa Nui), where they witnessed the arrival of the Hokule‘a outrigger canoe.

In Papeete, they visited the Pomaré IV high school and were welcomed by chants performed by French Polynesia students.

"From the cultural point of view, it's a very good opportunity for our kids to see the Hawaiian culture and the way their Hawaiian friends live,"

Christian Chêne, a teacher at Pomaré, said.

"It's very important, because the languages, for instance, are very similar. So are the traditions. So the children are beginning to see that their respective pasts are very much linked," Hawaiian teacher Richard Kirk explained in perfect French.

This bulletin was produced by the Pacific Islands News Association (PINA). Editor: Patrick Antoine Decloitre E-mail: padec@iname.com 

For more information, contact Nina Ratulele, PINA Administrator, at pina@is.com.fj 

Pacific Islands News Association (PINA) Damodar Centre, 1st Floor 46 Gordon Street Suva, Republic of the Fiji Islands Tel: (679) 303 623 Fax : (679) 303 943 Postal Address: PINA, Private Mail Bag, Suva, Fiji Islands

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