U.S. OFFICIAL DOBRIANSKY CITES KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

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SUVA, Fiji Islands (May28, 2002 – Pacific Newsline)---U.S. Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky says achieving sustainable development in both developed and developing countries will require support for effective domestic policies and the building of public-private partnerships.

In a policy address delivered May 23 to a meeting sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations and The Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., Dobriansky said those attending the upcoming World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg do not need to negotiate new goals or create new global bureaucracies.

"If we are serious, Johannesburg must be about actual implementation," she said. "The bottom line for a successful Johannesburg Summit will be imparting new momentum to achieve real development results."

Dobriansky said achieving these development results for nations begins with effective domestic policies, including the support and creation of effective democratic institutions, an independent judiciary, anti-corruption laws, sound monetary, fiscal and trade principles, and an informed decision-making process that takes into account science and the scientific method.

She said these aspects of governance maintain peace and stability, and contribute to economic growth, higher living standards, social equality and responsible environmental stewardship. "The world summit ... should concentrate on how the world can work together to encourage these needed changes" in order to promote sustainable development, she said.

Dobriansky said the best way to capitalize upon these effective domestic policies is through building and nurturing partnerships among governments, the private sector, non-governmental organizations and other elements of civil society.

"The United States has learned, through 60 years of concerted development assistance efforts, that the most successful programs and projects are unquestionably those that foster these partnerships," she said.

Dobriansky said one of the public-private initiatives the United States plans to showcase in Johannesburg is the Geographic Information for Sustainable Development Project, which makes satellite imagery available to people around the world to help them map watersheds, plan agricultural crop strategies and trace urbanization trends. The project joins the State Department and other U.S. government agencies with the Open Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Consortium, the largest industry association of GIS technology and services.

"It is a wonderful illustration of how public-private partnerships can be a force multiplier, leveraging resources for development," she said.

Following is the text of Dobriansky's remarks:

WORKING TOGETHER TO BUILD PROSPERITY

 

Delivered by Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula J. Dobriansky Council on Foreign Relations/The Brookings Institution Thursday, May 23, 2002

Thank you. I am pleased to be with you today and glad to have this opportunity to discuss our vision for meeting one of the great challenges of the new era we have entered - how to continue to widen the circle of hope and prosperity in ways that foster natural resource stewardship and environmental protection for current and future generations. It is a vision for implementing sustainable development that we hope others will share as well.

As President Bush recognized in his groundbreaking anti-poverty speech on March 14, preceding the Monterey Conference, there exists "a growing divide between wealth and poverty, between opportunity and misery that is both a challenge to our compassion and a source of instability." Building on the successful outcomes of the Doha Trade Ministerial, the Monterrey Financing for Development Summit, and the upcoming World Food Summit, the Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development can take practical measures to enhance human productivity, reduce poverty, and foster economic growth and opportunity together with environmental quality. Our shared commitment must be to provide all people with the opportunity to lead healthy, productive, and fulfilling lives.

We have decades of experience in the effort to alleviate poverty and help developing countries move along the path of sustainable economic growth. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of development assistance, as well as the results of both good and bad governance, and I believe the emerging new consensus reflects the lessons learned over this period. As President Bush put it clearly in Monterrey: "For decades, the success of development aid was measured only in the resources spent, not in the results achieved. Yet, pouring money into a failed status quo does little to help the poor, and can actually delay the progress of reform. We must accept a higher, more difficult, more promising call."

Next week, I will lead our U.S. delegation at a ministerial meeting in Indonesia to prepare for the Johannesburg Summit. The vision that we will take with us brims with expectation that the Johannesburg Summit will answer this "more promising call," providing positive, forward-looking leadership for domestic efforts and multilateral cooperation for years to come.

But if Johannesburg is to truly implement the international community's new consensus - demonstrated in Monterrey - to effectively mobilize resources for sustainable development, it should produce compelling results, not merely high-sounding rhetoric. We have already agreed upon Agenda 21 and the Millennium Declaration goals. The world community does not need to negotiate new goals or create new global bureaucracies. If we are serious, Johannesburg must be about actual implementation. UN Secretary General Kofi Annan has outlined this reality in a clear way, saying: "The Summit...aims to move from commitments - of which we have had plenty, 30 years ago and 10 years ago - to action." But how can we best make progress in realizing the agenda we have all agreed upon? How many children will escape childbirth death? How many mothers will survive childbirth and lead healthy lives? How many people will have access to safe drinking water and clean sources of energy? How many children can we send to school? How many people can we lift out of poverty? How many people around the world will be able to live in a clean environment? The bottom line for a successful Johannesburg Summit will be imparting new momentum to achieve real development results.

The essence of the message that the United States will carry to Johannesburg is that we must continue down the path laid out in Monterrey, working together to build global prosperity. Our vision for the World Summit on Sustainable Development is twofold. First, we believe sustainable development for every nation begins at home with the support of effective domestic policies. This is an unmistakable lesson of past development efforts. Second, we believe that the best way to capitalize upon these effective domestic policies is through building and nurturing local, national, and international public-private partnerships. Through this approach, sustainable development can be achieved in a way that benefits both developing and developed nations.

President Bush has emphasized that the hopes of all people, no matter where they live, lie in good governance, political and economic freedom, and the rule of law. These fundamental principles will generate and harness the human and financial resources needed to promote economic growth, a vibrant civil society, natural resource stewardship and environmental protection. Our goal is to ensure a better quality of life for all. Democracy and respect for human rights empower people to take charge of their own destinies.

Self-governing people prepared to participate in an open world marketplace are the very foundation of sustainable development, and that begins with good governance. Without a foundation of good governance, no amount of outside assistance will produce sustainable development. At the same time, effective domestic governance will tend to generate internal economic dynamism, become a magnet for local resources and foreign investment, and thus create the climate for economic success and social development.

Let me take a moment to outline what I mean when I speak of good governance. To begin, good governance encompasses the creation and support of effective democratic institutions - public institutions that will make policy objectively and rationally for the betterment of all citizens. Indispensable to good governance is an independent judiciary that will, in turn, implement these laws fairly and equitably. Inherent in these democratic institutions is the assurance that all members of society will enjoy a participatory role in government and have a meaningful voice in shaping their country's policies. In making domestic policies, governments should also adhere to sound monetary, fiscal, and trade principles that promote investment, economic growth, and advances social development, natural resource stewardship and environmental protection. Moreover, policy decisions must be reached through an informed decision-making process that takes into account science and the scientific method. And crucial to the hopes for any long-term success in building a stronger and more prosperous society is the assurance that corruption at all levels will be rooted out. Anti-corruption laws are needed, as well as a system that enforces these laws with commitment, swiftness, and equity.

These aspects of governance maintain peace and stability and mobilize internal and external resources in support of sustainable development. Additionally, they contribute to economic growth, higher living standards, social equality, and responsible environmental stewardship in which natural resources are wisely managed for both present and future generations. In order to promote sustainable development, the World Summit on Sustainable Development should concentrate on how the world can work together to encourage these needed changes.

We endorse and continue to support national efforts to improve transparency and domestic governance, and to fight against corruption. We support these efforts because we share, together with our partners, a strong commitment to the reality that only open, law-based societies that foster private investment, enterprise, and entrepreneurship can unleash our human potential to build lasting and widely shared prosperity. We also believe investment in basic health, education, and the environment is vital to advance social development and to give every person, especially children, a chance at sharing in the benefits of economic growth.

The second key to our vision is the idea that we must work effectively to address the challenges of sustainable development through partnerships among governments, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, and other elements of civil society.

One of the public-private initiatives we plan to showcase in Johannesburg is the Geographic Information for Sustainable Development Project, which makes satellite imagery available to people around the world – to policy-makers, to users, to scientists - so that they can get instant access to satellite photography. These pictures will help them map watersheds, plan agricultural crop strategies, and trace urbanization trends. Linking this data with geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning system (GPS) technology and the Internet gives us new ways to increase productivity and to bring the power of technology to the most distant corner of the world. Poor regions in Africa are the project's initial focus.

This project joins State, USAID, and the technical agencies of the U.S. government with the Open GIS Consortium, the largest industry association of GIS technology and services. It is a wonderful illustration of how public-private partnerships can be a force multiplier, leveraging resources for development. We in the United States government are working with our friends and allies to promote sustainable development. Yet no government - individually or collectively, developed or developing – can be successful without active partnership with the private sector, non-profit organizations, and other participants. We can strive together for freer and more open societies, thriving economies and healthy environments, and help developing countries integrate fully into the global economy to reap the benefits from international trade, investment, and cooperative partnerships.

The United States has learned, through 60 years of concerted development assistance efforts, that the most successful programs and projects are unquestionably those that foster these partnerships. Partnerships that creatively capture the human, technological, creative, and financial resources potentially available from non-government sources can achieve far more than the relatively few dollars available through all sources of official overseas development aid worldwide. The message from Monterrey is clear. There can be no sustainable development that is not grounded in productivity-driven growth of developing countries. The most important engine of growth is the private sector. Nine of every ten dollars are in the hands of the private sector - not governments. Furthermore, the examples that we have of successful development in parts of East Asia and Latin America show that the most dynamic growth, prosperity, and innovation are being forged by the energy, risks and rewards of non-governmental actors.

We hope that the dialogue leading up to Johannesburg opens channels of communication and fosters creative thinking across the spectrum of governments, non-government actors, individuals, and businesses, to identify their common interests and create a plan to advance them together. In partnership, we will work at Johannesburg to unite governments, the private sector and civil society to strengthen democratic institutions of governance, open markets, and mobilize and use all development resources more effectively. These resources include domestic savings, trade and investment, traditional aid and private philanthropy, capacity-building programs, and efforts to promote the spread of environmentally sensitive industrial, agricultural, educational, and scientific technologies. Our shared commitment will be to provide all people with the opportunities to lead healthy, productive, and fulfilling lives.

As we work toward advancing lasting reforms, we invite developed and developing nations alike to join us to:

-- Open our economies and societies to growth;

-- Provide freedom, security, and hope for present and future generations;

-- Provide all people with the opportunity for healthy and productive lives;

-- Serve as good stewards of our natural resources and our environment.

Through these measures, the Johannesburg Summit can strengthen and build upon the new international consensus on sustainable development. To this end, we will work to advance through concrete actions the following goals:

-- Reduce the number of people living without safe drinking water, and provide integrated, watershed approaches to manage water and land resources;

-- Enhance access to and adoption, where appropriate, of clean energy, including renewables, from village to metropolis;

-- Stem the global pandemic of AIDS, and drastically reduce tuberculosis and malaria;

-- Ensure universal access to basic education and eliminate gender disparities;

-- Reduce hunger and increase sustainable agricultural productivity in the developing world without further degradation of forests and fragile lands;

-- Manage and conserve our forests and the vital resources of our oceans.

We rededicate ourselves to turn our vision into reality, and we support immediate, concrete action to this end. The test of any man lies not in espousing words but in fulfilling deeds, and the true test of the World Summit on Sustainable Development will lie not in the rhetoric that is negotiated but in actions taken to improve conditions worldwide. The new vision President Bush emphasized before Monterey unleashes the potential of those who are poor, instead of locking them into a cycle of dependence. This new vision looks beyond arbitrary inputs from the rich, and demands tangible outcomes for the poor. Likewise, Johannesburg demands a new vision of real reforms in developing nations, strengthened by real support from international partnerships. Through this new vision, we invite the world's citizens and their governments to work together to build global prosperity.

"Pacific Newsline" United States Embassy Suva, Fiji Phone: 679-314466 EXT 8152 Fax: 679-308685 E-mail: suvapacificnewsline@state.gov 

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