LEAVE ‘DAY OF PRAYER’ TO CHURCHES

Editorial

LEAVE ‘DAY OF PRAYER’ TO CHURCHES

PNG Post-Courier

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea (Dec. 29) – THE Government’s idea of a National Day of Prayer is noble. But it should support the churches to organise and run it while the Government provides financial and logistical support.

The state should not get itself involved in organising an event that is the domain of the churches. No. It should let the churches organise it.

The church knows how to talk to God. The Government doesn’t.

The public will be suspicious of the Government trying to organise a National Day of Prayer when it has so much unfinished business on its own plate

The task for the National Events Council should be to liaise with the leaders of churches and support them in organising the event, instead of the council trying to be at the forefront trying to tell the churches what to do and how to do it. The National Day of Prayer will be a time to ask for forgiveness and guidance in the trying times ahead.

Christians all over Papua New Guinea should devote this time to pray for God’s wisdom in election 2007. Christians should pray that God will deliver to this nation a government that upholds the rule of law, that fights corruption, that puts the interests of the people and children of Papua New Guinea before their own selfish needs.

A government that says publicly that it believes in God and yet plunders the resources of the people of God is not worthy to be governing God’s people. A government that turns a blind eye on bribery and corrupt practices that result in God’s people being denied access to services must not be allowed to occupy the high offices of this nation.

The National Day of Prayer must be a time to ask God to give this nation a new direction for the sake of the children of today and tomorrow – and of the future. The year 2006 has now come to an end.

It has been a great year for Papua New Guinea with the Government recording more than K1 billion in budget surplus that has gone into supplementary budgets to fund urgent development needs.

The real question is whether those funds will be put to the use they were intended for. With a public service machinery as inefficient and ineffective as it has been, the majority of the people in the remote areas will need to pray harder that their prayers for services will be answered and services delivered on time. Finally, to all our loyal readers and business clients — thank you for all your support through this year and we look forward to your continued support in 2007. Happy New Year!

Rate this article: 
No votes yet

Add new comment