PAPUA NEW GUINEA CAMPAIGN TARGETS ILLEGAL ALIENS

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By Sheila Lasibori

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea (The National, Sept. 11) - The department of Foreign Affairs and Immigration has launched an operation to rid the country of aliens who have entered the country illegally and are known to be living in various provinces.

The operation is codenamed Rausim Alien, which is being carried out with the assistance of police and Labour Department officials. The operation was started in Milne Bay province.

Officers from the immigration and citizenship service division are now in Mt Hagen to conduct ‘on the spot’ check on foreigners living and working there.

Two officers from the division yesterday traveled to Mt Hagen where they are expected to conduct the checks with assistance from police and officers from the Labour Department.

Acting director general Joseph Nobetau in a letter dated September 7, informed the provincial administrator of Western Highlands province of the checks, which was originally scheduled to start last Sunday but was deferred. West New Britain is the next province being targeted by the department.

A Chinese national was fined PGK4,000 [US$1,413] last Thursday to avoid a five-month jail term for remaining in the country without an entry permit, was deported yesterday. Compliance division officers from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Immigration were yesterday at the Jackson International Airport and made sure Dongzin Zheng departed on the Singapore flight at 3 p.m.

Dongzin paid the fine after the Boroko District Court convicted him of breaching Section 6 (1) (a) of the Migration Act. The court issued a certificate of conviction dated September 6 against Dongzin of Minxin village, Fujian province.

Migration officials have also detained two Asians at the Boroko police station after suspecting the men of "dubiously obtaining entry permits and visas."

Officers from the department said the men were arrested last Thursday and would be deported this Thursday after travel arrangements via Hong Kong are finalized.

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