PNG’S $47 MILLION JET FLIES OVER A LAND WITHOUT

Editorial

PNG’S $47 MILLION JET FLIES OVER A LAND WITHOUT

PNG Post-Courier

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea (Nov. 25, 2009) - We know that Papua New Guineans are resourceful people, the type who often make do with their own best efforts instead of crying for outside help.

Anyone who has lived in the rural areas and traveled outside our cities and towns will know that.

People run into problems and without being able to go on the Internet and find a solution, or without any chance to call in the nearby suburban technician, they fiddle and tinker in an effort to solve their dilemmas "long ples".

Their strength in surmounting adversity at home is also a weakness. That’s because people running governments in the provinces and in the National Capital District know about this innate ability to survive and it is in the backs of their minds, we are sure, when deciding how and where to spend the nation’s money.

We suspect this is why so many government functions are poorly administered and funded in the rural areas. Politicians and bureaucrats have this knowledge that people can cope and do not feel obliged to do something more about rectifying these shortcomings or embarrassed to a great degree that our people are still left to their own resources.

We have been publishing some good news reports in recent times, accounts of how some fine citizens have been doing their best for their fellow Papua New Guineans for little or no reward, just because they feel an empathy for their people in their grim life situations.

One such example is the young nurse whose deeds and fine attitude towards her people in South Bougainville are chronicled on page 7. Read it, we implore you, it will help to revive your good feelings about people. And it’s a reminder that while Bougainvilleans have aspirations for their region, they are still saddled by similar handicaps and pitfalls as the rest of Papua New Guinea.

Let us hope our rulers think of these things when it comes to deciding on spending priorities.

That jet cost PGK120 million [US$47 million]. Think of how many rural shortcomings could be solved with that sort of money!

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