U.S. REASSURES GUAM AMID KOREAS SKIRMISH

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Guam within 2,000 miles of Seoul

By Therese Hart HAGATNA, Guam (Marianas Variety, Nov. 26, 2010) – Congresswoman Madeleine Z. Bordallo said the U.S. military assured her that there was no imminent threat to Guam despite the recent skirmish between North and South Korea.

Bordallo said the situation is a reminder of how important U.S. power is in the Asia-Pacific Region.

"I was informed that this situation poses no immediate threat to our island; however, we will continue to monitor this situation. This blatant attack against our ally, South Korea, is in clear violation of international law and the sovereign rights of South Korea," Bordallo said in a media statement.

Guam is about 1,778 miles away from Seoul.

"This attack by North Korea is a reminder of the importance of the United States remaining a vigilant and visible power in the Asia-Pacific region. Further, it highlights the importance of realigning our military forces in this region to be better postured to address destabilizing events," Bordallo said.

According to the White House, President Obama told South Korean President Lee Myung Bak that the U.S. "stands shoulder to shoulder" with its Asian ally after North Korea’s artillery attack near a disputed maritime border on Tuesday.

Obama told Lee in a telephone call that he "strongly condemned the attack."

The two leaders agreed to hold joint military exercises and training "in the days ahead."

"The United States remains firmly and fully committed to the defense of its ally," the White House statement said.

According to the Daily Yomiuri, North Korea fired 170 artillery in Tuesday’s barrage that killed two South Korean marines and burned down 19 homes.

Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan has called on China to use its influence over North Korea to help ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

China and the United States pledged to maintain peace and stability and to seek denuclearization on the Korean peninsula, as well as an early resumption of six-party talks, the Chinese Foreign Ministry said on its website.

Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Cui Tiankai and U.S. envoy Stephen Bosworth met in Beijing and made the pledge a day after the shelling.

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