Large New Market For West Papua Women Opens In Jayapura

Modern facility to help empower grassroots participation in economy

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (Radio New Zealand International, Jan. 18, 2017) – A large new purpose-built market for West Papuan women vendors is beginning operations in downtown Jayapura.

The construction of the building known as Pasar Mama Mama Papua, or the Mama Mama Market, was completed shortly before Christmas.

The market was commissioned by Indonesia's President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo, who oversaw groundbreaking of the construction effort in April last year.

It is billed as part of his campaign to enable better grassroots participation in economic development in Papua.

The market is described by Jakarta as a way of empowering Papuan women who are the key players in the traditional markets where fresh, home-grown produce is sold.

For many years the Papuan capital lacked an adequate central market in Jayapura, with women vendors left to sell in an unused car park on a busy street corner.

Similar to a major new market in the nearby town of Sentani, this market complex has streamlined electricity and modern toilet facilities.

It is designed in a way to offer Papua's indigenous Melanesians a way to better market their produce, literally lifting their wares off the floor.

The market was commissioned by Indonesia's President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo, who oversaw groundbreaking of the construction effort in April last year.

It is billed as part of his campaign to enable better grassroots participation in economic development in Papua.

The market is described by Jakarta as a way of empowering Papuan women who are the key players in the traditional markets where fresh, home-grown produce is sold.

For many years the Papuan capital lacked an adequate central market in Jayapura, with women vendors left to sell in an unused car park on a busy street corner.

Similar to a major new market in the nearby town of Sentani, this market complex has streamlined electricity and modern toilet facilities.

It is designed in a way to offer Papua's indigenous Melanesians a way to better market their produce, literally lifting their wares off the floor.

"The core problem of poverty in Papua is because indigenous Papuans are not able to access and keep permanent jobs, or incapable to establish and grow sustainable businesses," said the spokesperson.

"This is due to lack of lifeskills and education (informal or formal) that allows them to be competitive in a 21st century economy."

Radio New Zealand International
Copyright © 2017 RNZI. All Rights Reserved

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