Opinion

Sun
26
Mar

A Tribute To The Late Dr. Teresia Teaiwa By Sia Figiel

 

Renowned Samoan novelist, playright, and painter Sia Figiel composed the following tribute to the late Dr. Teresia Teaiwa, which was read by Dr. Teaiwa's eldest son, Manoa Teaiwa, at the memorial service. 

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Mon
13
Mar

If U.S. Refuses To Take Manus Refugees, Australia Will Do Nothing

 

I can tell you what the Australian Government is going to do about the refugees on Manus Island who won't be resettled in the United States. Nothing. There are potentially hundreds of men on Manus Island who could — if the figure of 1,250 refugees to be taken by the United States is correct — be left behind. Parliamentary Library figures show there are at least 1,616 refugees on the two islands — 941 on Nauru and 675 on Manus.

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Wed
01
Mar

A Tribute to The Honorable Faleomavaega Eni Faua‘a Hunkin

 

The moon has fallen. The sun has turned crimson. The light that once covered the sea and the land and the skies and illuminated our days that seemed so multitudinous is there no more. And the world has suddenly become dark and cold as we shiver under the shadow of the stars who weep with us in the distance. Who will wipe these tears from our grieving eyes? Who will comfort us now in our hour of need? The clouds have abandoned the sky. 

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Wed
15
Feb

Former FSM President Concerned About Amending Constitution's Citizenship Clause

 

I write this Open Letter to you to share my deep concern about the proposed amendment to Section 3 of Article III of our national constitution. This current provision of our national constitution requires that an FSM citizen who is also a citizen of another country should “register his intent to remain a citizen” of our country, the Federated States of Micronesia, and “renounce his citizenship of another nation” within 3 years of his 18th birthday. In plain English, it means that a minor who holds a dual citizenship of Federated States of Micronesia and the United States, for example, because he or she was born in the United States to parents who are both FSM citizens or one was FSM citizen must register his or her intent to remain FSM citizen before he or she reaches 21 years old. If he or she fails to register as FSM citizen he or she will no longer be FSM citizen, but he or she will remain as a FSM national. 

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Wed
08
Feb

Who Said The Church And State Are Supposed To Be Separate?

 

The outpouring of support and admiration for the government’s push to amend the Constitution to declare Samoa officially as a Christian state has been overwhelming. Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sa’ilele Malielegaoi is without a doubt the man of the moment. He is being hailed by church leaders in all corners of this country as savior of Samoa for initiating what they say is something that should have been done a long time ago.

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Thu
02
Feb

Fiji Media Cases Raise Questions About Prosecutorial Consistency

 

In 2016, two of Fiji’s main media organisations, the privately owned Fiji Times and state-owned Fiji Broadcasting Corporation, came to public attention, for the wrong reasons — laws regarding ethnic sensibilities in multiracial Fiji. The international community needs to note that taken together, they call into question the neutrality of Fiji’s prosecuting, regulating and defending institutions.

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Thu
26
Jan

An Independent Guam Would Survive; Be A Key U.S. Ally

 

In my own education on political status, this quote from the late Guam Sen. Frank Lujan in his article, “Sleeping Beauty: Times Passes By,” played a pivotal role in helping me see new and firmer truths, just beyond the colonial common sense: “Those who defend Guam's colonial status argue that economic independence for Guam is impractical. We happen to agree. Guam by herself can never be economically independent. But nor can our great mother country the United States. There no longer is any such animal as an independent nation in the world today. ... All nations in the latter part of the 20th century are economically interdependent.” There is so much to unpack in this simple quote, so much to discuss in terms of the way people misunderstand decolonization and independence.

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Thu
27
Oct

'Leadership Malaise' In CNMI Has Lead To Poverty

 

Apathy and lack of trust in government is widespread throughout the CNMI. This sentiment is as disturbing as it is troubling. It is easily seen among villagers who had to break out on their own to survive. It was forced abject poverty, full square! You suffer from it daily. Take a closer look at the cringing faces of villagers the next time you’re out and about. They’re reaching down into the depth of their soul struggling to understand deterioration of family life in these isles.

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Wed
05
Oct

Cook Islands Land Should Not Be A Commodity

 

Land has become quite the issue in this week’s discussions as has been the idea of Maori customary title. Words like ownership, recompense, leases and the idea that for some our fiscal return has not been what it should be and for others, will my family kick me off the land after 60 years. Talk of foreigners determining our rights, our view and our customary possession of land. One needs only read the land court publications, or talk to some about land issues to see how deep and far reaching this idea has become. Families, including my own, sadly can testify to the division and manamanata, that has been caused by land disputes. Brother against sister, mother against children, families against families.

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Wed
06
Jul

18 Years Since The Biak Massacre In West Papua; Suffering Still Ongoing

 

On the 2 July 1998, the West Papuan Morning Star flag was raised on top of a water tower near the harbour in Biak. Up to 75 people gathered beneath it singing songs and holding traditional dances. As the rally continued, many more people in the area joined in with numbers reaching up to 500 people. On the July 6 the Indonesian security forces attacked the demonstrators, massacring scores of people.

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